March 15, 2014

mohrigan:

How to make fake fur with wool thread (This takes a while XD)
I founded this video how a girl made a tail with this method and decided to try it for a teemo neck fur, turned lovely! But u need a looooot of time and patience.
Video: http://youtu.be/uVXO7khBFz4 My page: www.facebook.com/m.cosplay

mohrigan:

How to make fake fur with wool thread (This takes a while XD)

I founded this video how a girl made a tail with this method and decided to try it for a teemo neck fur, turned lovely! But u need a looooot of time and patience.

Video: http://youtu.be/uVXO7khBFz4
My page: www.facebook.com/m.cosplay

(via siffieleafy)

February 27, 2014

dark-zeblock:

I found some old art books today called ‘Celtic Art: The methods of Construction by George Bain’ Which, I found interesting. I only have 4 out of the 7, they are very old (From 55 years ago). I thought I would just share some scans from them, some people might find them useful. :)

Edit

And I just noticed there is two images the same. -_-” Sorry about that, I’ll replace it with a different one later… -_-‘

(via denmark-official)

February 12, 2014

tryinghuman:

Here’s a tutorial I did on the basics behind modeling a reference using Sculptris.  

Bonus: Hue and Rose pop up near the end! :D

February 5, 2014

owlygem:

kyletwebster:

The image above was painted in Photoshop. I mean, it was actually PAINTED - using brush strokes and a tablet.  The shapes shown above are not ‘stamped’ onto the canvas - these are not one-off ‘shape’ brushes, like the other watercolor sets floating around. No, no, no - no sir! The pen stylus was dragged across the tablet, creating lines and circles and irregular edges and all the lovely watercolor goodness you see here. No tricks, no filters, no added textures. The salt was applied using two custom salt brushes. The softened edges were a combination of brush pressure and direction, as well as my custom ‘Watercolor Soft Edger’ tool. I look forward to making this brush set available before the end of the month. Get ready for some REAL WATERCOLOR PAINTING in Photoshop, Friends! KYLEBRUSH.COM

Reblogging for later, kyles brushes are the best, seriously worth paying for!

owlygem:

kyletwebster:

The image above was painted in Photoshop. I mean, it was actually PAINTED - using brush strokes and a tablet.  The shapes shown above are not ‘stamped’ onto the canvas - these are not one-off ‘shape’ brushes, like the other watercolor sets floating around. No, no, no - no sir! The pen stylus was dragged across the tablet, creating lines and circles and irregular edges and all the lovely watercolor goodness you see here. No tricks, no filters, no added textures. The salt was applied using two custom salt brushes. The softened edges were a combination of brush pressure and direction, as well as my custom ‘Watercolor Soft Edger’ tool. I look forward to making this brush set available before the end of the month. Get ready for some REAL WATERCOLOR PAINTING in Photoshop, Friends! KYLEBRUSH.COM

Reblogging for later, kyles brushes are the best, seriously worth paying for!

January 23, 2014

odditiesoflife:

10 of the Most Majestic Caves in the World

  1. Ice Cave Near The Mutnovsky Volcano, Russia - Ice caves like these form in the glaciers surrounding the Mutnovsky Volcano in Russia. Some of them are formed by vents that release volcanic heat and gases called fumaroles. (photo by Florian Wizorek)
  2. Glowworms Cave, New Zealand - The Waitomo glowworm caves are home to a unique insect – the glowworm. These insects hang glistening silken strands from the ceiling of the cave and glow to attract unsuspecting prey. (photo by waitomo.com)
  3. Son Doong Cave, Vietnam - This is the largest currently known cave in the world. It is filled with countless wonders including isolated ecosystems, weather systems and geological formations. (photo by National Geographic)
  4. Batu Caves, Malaysia - These caves have been used by English and Chinese settlers as well as the indigenous Temuan people. The bat guano in the cave was mined for agricultural purposes, but now the cave is filled with statues and is open to visitors. (photo by Danny Xeero)
  5. Marble Caves, Patagonia - Theses caves are known for the spectacular reflections that the turquoise water casts on the white marble ceiling of the cave. They are also called the Marble Cathedral because of their beautiful and arching forms. (photo by kellywhite)
  6. Phraya Nakhon Cave, Thailand - This cave was historically a popular visiting place for local kings because of the illumination provided by the collapsed roofs. The pavilion in the center was built for the visit of King Chulalongkorn in 1890. (photo by Wasitpol Unchanakorrakit)
  7. Ellison’s Cave, United States - This photograph is of the Fantastic Cave pit, part of Ellison’s Cave in the state of Georgia. It is a popular attraction for pit cavers – those who enjoy rappelling down vertical subterranean drops. (photo by secondglobe.com)
  8. Vatnajokull Glacier Cave, Iceland - This cave is located in the largest glacier in Europe. Caves like these form due to melting glacial icewater, but they can be dangerous because glaciers are constantly breaking and changing. (photo by Einar Runar Sigurdson)
  9. Cave in Algarve, Portugal - Due to its location, the cave is prone to various seaside formations because of the rock face’s relative solubility in water. This specific cave near Lagos is accessible only by water. (photo by Bruno Carlos)
  10. Reed Flute Cave, China - The Reed Flute Cave in Guangxi, China has been visited by tourists for at least 1200 years. The cave is home to a spectacular array of stalagmites and stalactites. It is named for the reeds that grow at its mouth, which can be made into flutes. (photo by Pasquale di Pilato)

(Source: odditiesoflife, via czerwone)

January 18, 2014

...

January 12, 2014

schweizercomics:

myshrinkingviolet:

Someone requested a hand tutorial, so I rambled. I didn’t even get to everything I would like to, so here is a part!

Thanks.  I’ve been consciously trying to get better at hands for ten years, and I still suck, so I’m always grateful for new tutorials.  Someday, one diagram, one line is gonna click it for me.  This one’s great.

(via flipstableruns)

January 9, 2014

palidoozy-art:

As per request (thanks, singingrabbitskull!), I did a half-tutorial, half-sporadic notes on how I generally render basic expressions.

There’s already a lot of cool tutorials that exist on how to do expressions, so I tried to just look at a lot of really minor details that I’ve used but haven’t seen commonly passed down.

required disclaimer: this is just how I go about it, feel free to ignore bits, steal bits, do whatever you want with them. Hope this helps, and if you have any questions scream at my inbox!

(via varrka)

January 8, 2014

wannabeanimator:

cassiesart:

scribblingaladdertothemoon:

Having troubles with facial angles in your drawing style?
Try a 3D sculpture of your art in your own style in a free program that is simple and very easy to use.
The program is called Sculptris and is a free off-shoot program from Zbrush, that program that you keep hearing about but either takes selling your kidneys or piracy to actually use. 
If you download it and sculpt out a facial model, you can have references for your own work for all of time. No more endlessly searching Google for reference materials or twisting/rotating/flipping a drawing to see if there are flaws. And you can easily edit it to create more facial types. This way, you can make character references for any and every face and facial angle that you can think of.
The program offers mirroring right from the start, so your faces will be perfectly symmetrical. You can turn off the symmetry for things like scars or otherwise. 
It takes a little time. For instance, I downloaded the program on Christmas and, in my spare time, this took a few days of getting familiar with the program (first day) and then sculpting for a few minutes each day, mostly due to my perfectionist nature. And this one isn’t even done. I still have to mold the mouth, ears, and other smaller aspects before I consider it done. However, I was so giddy over the possibilities that I wanted to share this with my fellow artists.
From now on, I have reference for a face in my own style and will be able to create things so much easier in the future. I hope that this helps you guys and that you have fun with it. 

I absolutely recommend Sculptris!

A really great watered-down version of ZBrush. Perfect for people who have never used any 3D software before.

wannabeanimator:

cassiesart:

scribblingaladdertothemoon:

Having troubles with facial angles in your drawing style?

Try a 3D sculpture of your art in your own style in a free program that is simple and very easy to use.

The program is called Sculptris and is a free off-shoot program from Zbrush, that program that you keep hearing about but either takes selling your kidneys or piracy to actually use. 

If you download it and sculpt out a facial model, you can have references for your own work for all of time. No more endlessly searching Google for reference materials or twisting/rotating/flipping a drawing to see if there are flaws. And you can easily edit it to create more facial types. This way, you can make character references for any and every face and facial angle that you can think of.

The program offers mirroring right from the start, so your faces will be perfectly symmetrical. You can turn off the symmetry for things like scars or otherwise. 

It takes a little time. For instance, I downloaded the program on Christmas and, in my spare time, this took a few days of getting familiar with the program (first day) and then sculpting for a few minutes each day, mostly due to my perfectionist nature. And this one isn’t even done. I still have to mold the mouth, ears, and other smaller aspects before I consider it done. However, I was so giddy over the possibilities that I wanted to share this with my fellow artists.

From now on, I have reference for a face in my own style and will be able to create things so much easier in the future. 

I hope that this helps you guys and that you have fun with it. 

I absolutely recommend Sculptris!

A really great watered-down version of ZBrush. Perfect for people who have never used any 3D software before.

(via varrka)

December 24, 2013

kitkatghost:

elle-est-aimee:

How to, step-by-step, make expressions mean different things by changing just one facial feature at a time. *shrug* I’m not very good at explaining how I do expressions, I just…feel out what kinds of muscles seem to fit and tweak those. And sometimes, ever so slightly, little adjustments could mean the difference between fury and euphoria. 

reference,

(via siffieleafy)

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